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A Grand Place

arizona

Grand storm over the canyon


Cliche, yep that is what it can be. For over twenty years I refused to shoot here because it was “Over shot”.
Thankfully I am over that ;)

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Canyonlands

White Rim Overlook Canyonlands National Park,Utah

Canyonlands National Park overlook.


Canyonlands overlook of the White Rim. I still have a couple of openings on this fun trip. It will be prime time for Mesa Arch and starlight and light painting photography. By November in the Canyon country the light becomes softer and there could even be a chance of snow!

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Cool times

Northern Lights

Northern light and moon rise from my Alask Northern Lights workshop

I was just working on next years Northern lights workshop while I am here in the Arizona heat and thought everyone would like to see something a little cooler.

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Canyonlands and Arches in November

Photographer in Canyonlands

Photographing Mesa Arch


Mesa Arch is a pretty cool location and this guy couldn’t get close enough. Thankfully he didn’t go over the 1500 foot drop on the other side.

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Wire fences and meals on wheels.

Grand Teton

Crossbuck Fence Wyoming


I always felt these old jack fences were one of the most charming things about Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National park. They remind me of the old days with this land was home to big ranches settled on a dangerous frontier. Today these fences are being ripped out. Destroyed in the name of wildlife management. After 150 years of wildlife migration through the valley it has been decided that these remnants of a culture past need to go.

Damn stupid if you ask me! I am all for preserving our wildlife but there are ways to accomplish wildlife conservation and preserve things from the past. What about the simple concept of putting in a fence the current bureaucrats think is more wildlife friendly every few hundred yards? Naw, it is easier to destroy a reminder of the past. Maybe, just maybe, we can remove the idea that this land was settled by men of great courage and self-reliance who built fences from the the material at hand.
Of course that is silly, time moves on, the wooden boardwalk sidewalks are slippery, a log fence might slow down a migration that has been going on for 150 years.

Who knows what is to come. Maybe they will build a bicycle path in a place that is suppose to be the home of predators who chase things that run away from them. UMMM

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Greatest show on earth.

Wildebeest migration

Truly the greatest show on earth.


We had waited a long time for this moment, photographing lion cubs playing with their tails, chewing on their moms ears, elephants bathing at sunset, cheetahs forever on the hunt as we reviled at their clever ambushes. But this was what we had come for; just to feel the earth move as the Wildebeest, Zebras, and Impala crossed the plane was a experience beyond belief.

Yet we waited, each with our own thoughts, watching the event unfold. The movement across the miles of grassland and the heat had taken its measure on the now thirsty herds. But the migrants knew of the danger that lay in the water, for the Crocks were hungry too.

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Sand in our shoes.

Totem and Yei Bi Chei.

Monument Valley sunrise


We had loaded the van in silence, still groggy from a nights sleep that was to short. When we met my friend and guide Ray in the parking lot near the Mittens over look there was not yet a hint of sunrise in the eastern sky, but we had high hopes for things to come.
Soon the suburban rattled and lurched over the torturous road into the core of Monument Valley. We were headed for the scared locations in the backcountry where you are not allowed to go without a native guide. The land of the Totem and Yei Bi Chei.

After many trips into the valley I am still in awe of the beauty and silence as the morning unfolds in this sacred place. My heart beats faster as we quickly walk over the sand dunes now hurrying to catch the best angle of light, I can now see just a hint go orange glowing beyond the monuments.

Setting up our tripods we concentrate on the changing light, sometimes uttering a whisper of awe. I move with the light trying to capture the scene the best I can while helping my student to capture their vision. Then too soon the light becomes harsh and it is time to move to a better location. Walking back to the suburban we now are fully awake to a brilliant day in the heart of Navajo land, looking at each other with a smile on our faces and sand in our shoes we move to the next location.

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Nature, Life and death in Yellowstone

Life and death

wolf killing elk

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In again, out again

sunrise over the grand canyon

Sunrise at the Grand Canyon.


I have had a crazy schedule this spring with Slot Canyons, Monument Valley, CanyonLands, Arches, Sedona and the Grand Canyon all one on top of the next. Luckily I get 3 days before heading off to Rock Spring an Wild Horses. Maybe after I finish there I will actually have time to look at some of the images I shot over the past couple of months. This is the first photo I took yesterday morning after the snow storm at the Grand Canyon.

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Northern Lights

North of Fairbanks over the Alaska wilderness

Northern Lights

We had a great display the first night of my Aurora workshop. This is from the wild country north of Fairbanks at around -20.

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